Past investigations

 

All past ICAC investigations which have been publicly reported are summarised below.

 

Investigations reported in the past 10 years

For all ICAC investigations publicly reported in the past 10 years, the ICAC’s report or reports on the investigation are available online by clicking on the investigation title and following the links. Where available, other public material related to the investigation, such as transcripts of public inquiry proceedings, media releases and fact sheets, ICAC recommendations and investigation outcomes, is also provided.

 

Investigations reported more than 10 years ago

For all ICAC investigations publicly reported more than 10 years ago, only a summary of the investigation is available online. To obtain the ICAC’s report or reports on these investigations, go to the relevant investigation summary and click on the "Request the report" link.

 

2014

The ICAC investigated a number of allegations involving the former Mayor of the City of Ryde, Ivan Petch, and others, including the alleged release of confidential council information by Mr Petch on many occasions for various reasons, including in an attempt to undermine council employees, such as the former General Manager, Mr John Neish.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 30 June 2014, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Mr Petch, John Goubran and Richard Henricus. The Commission is of the opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) with respect to the prosecution of Mr Petch, Mr Goubran, Anthony Stavrinos, John Booth and Mr Henricus for various offences.

The ICAC is of the opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the DPP also with respect to the prosecution of Mr Petch, councillors Justin Li, Jeffrey Salvestro-Martin, Terry Perram and former councillor Victor Tagg for offences under the Election Funding, Expenditure and Disclosures Act 1981 in relation to advertising published in The Weekly Times in August and September 2012. The Commission also recommends that the Office of Local Government gives consideration to disciplinary action against Mr Petch, with a view to his dismissal.

Exhibits

List of exhibits

 

The ICAC investigated allegations that, between 2000 and 2011, then Member of Parliament (MP), the Hon Edward Obeid MLC, misused his position as an MP to attempt to influence other public officials to exercise their official functions with respect to retail leases at Circular Quay, without disclosing that he, his family or a related entity had an interest in some of those leases. It is also alleged that during the same period, certain public officials improperly exercised their official functions, with respect to retail leases at Circular Quay, to benefit Mr Obeid or his family (Operation Cyrus).

The Commission also investigated allegations that, between 2005 and 2008, Mr Obeid misused his position as an MP to attempt to influence other public officials to make decisions favouring Direct Health Solutions Pty Ltd, without disclosing that he, his family or a related entity had an interest in that company (Operation Meeka).

The Commission also investigated allegations that, between 2007 and 2008, Mr Obeid misused his position as an MP to influence other public officials to exercise their official functions with respect to the review and grant of water licences at Cherrydale Park, without disclosing that he, his family or a related entity had an interest in the licences. It is also alleged that during the same period, certain public officials improperly exercised their official functions with respect to the review and grant of the water licences at Cherrydale Park (Operation Cabot).

In its report on Operations Cabot and Meeka, released on 5 June 2014, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Mr Obeid. In Operation Cabot, the Commission is of the opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) with respect to the prosecution of Mr Obeid for common law criminal offences of misconduct in public office.

In its report on Operation Cyrus, also released on 5 June 2014, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Mr Obeid, the Hon Joseph Tripodi and Steve Dunn. The Commission is of the opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the DPP with respect to the prosecution of Mr Obeid for common law criminal offences of misconduct in public office.

The ICAC investigated allegations that the NSW State Emergency Service (SES) Commissioner, Murray Kear, took detrimental action against Deputy Commissioner Tara McCarthy, including dismissal from her position on 14 May 2013, in reprisal for Ms McCarthy making allegations to Mr Kear that SES Deputy Commissioner Steven Pearce had engaged in corrupt conduct.

The ICAC also examined allegations that Mr Kear improperly showed favour to Mr Pearce by failing to appropriately investigate allegations made by Ms McCarthy that Mr Pearce had engaged in corruption. It was also alleged that in relation to the above allegations, Mr Kear made false statements or attempted to mislead an officer of the ICAC in their exercise of their functions under the Independent Commission Against Corruption Act 1988.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 28 May 2014, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Mr Kear. The Commission is of the opinion that the advice of the director of public prosecution should be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Kear for an offence under the Public Interest Disclosures Act 1994 of taking detrimental action in reprisal for a person making a public interest disclosure.

The ICAC is also of the opinion that the minister for police and emergency services should give consideration to the taking of action against Mr Kear for disciplinary offences of misconduct with a view to his dismissal.

The ICAC investigated allegations that Christopher Binos, a former heavy vehicle competency-based assessor acting on behalf of Roads and Maritime Services (RMS), solicited benefits from applicants for heavy vehicle licences, and conducted fraudulent heavy vehicle assessments. It was also alleged that Mr Binos signed log books certifying applicants as competent to drive a heavy vehicle without the applicants completing the necessary assessments, in exchange for cash payments.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 24 January 2014, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Mr Binos, Alexander Daubney, Mark McDonagh, Peter Friend-Ngui, Shane Florio and Jacqueline Riley. The Commission is of the opinion that the advice of the director of public prosecution should be sought with respect to the prosecution of the above individuals for specified offences. The Commission has made one corruption prevention recommendation to the RMS.

2013

The ICAC investigated allegations concerning the possession and supply of steroids and other matters involving a Corrective Services NSW corrections officer.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 26 September 2013, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Robert Di-Bona and Christopher Warren. The Commission is of the opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions should be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Di-Bona for six offences of giving false evidence to the Commission, contrary to section 87 of the Independent Commission Against Corruption Act 1988. No corruption prevention recommendations are made with respect to this particular report as the Commission is of the view that the recommendations contained in its January 2013 report on a previous investigation concerning CSNSW also address the risks exposed in this investigation.

The ICAC investigated allegations concerning the process relating to the supply of security services to several NSW public authorities.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 26 September 2013, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Daniel Paul, Peter (Charles) Diekman, Peter Roche, Paul Thompson, Robert Huskic, David McMicking and Jonathan Nguyen. The Commission is of the opinion that the advice of the director of public prosecution should be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Paul, Mr Diekman and Mr Huskic for specified offences. The Commission has made 11 corruption prevention recommendations to help NSW government agencies address weaknesses in the procurement and management of security services.

The ICAC investigated, among other issues, the circumstances surrounding a decision made in 2008 by the then Minister for Primary Industries and Minister for Mineral Resources, the Hon Ian Macdonald MLC, to open a mining area in the Bylong Valley for coal exploration, including whether the decision was influenced by the Hon Edward Obeid MLC (Operation Jasper).

The ICAC also investigated the circumstances in which Moses Obeid provided the Hon Eric Roozendaal MLC with a motor vehicle in 2007 (Operation Indus).

The Commission also investigated, among other issues, the circumstances surrounding the issue of an invitation to Doyles Creek Pty Ltd to apply for, and allocation of, an exploration licence (Operation Acacia).

In its report on Operation Jasper, released on 31 July 2013, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Hon Edward Obeid MLC (Edward Obeid Sr), Moses Obeid, Travers Duncan, John McGuigan, John Atkinson, John Kinghorn and Richard Poole. The Commission is of the opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of Mr Macdonald, Edward Obeid Sr, Moses Obeid, Mr Duncan, Mr McGuigan, Mr Atkinson and Mr Poole for various offences.

In its report on Operation Indus, also released on 31 July 2013, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Moses Obeid. The Commission is of the opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of Moses Obeid, Paul Obeid, Rocco Triulcio and Rosario Triulcio for offences of providing false or misleading evidence to the ICAC. There are no corruption prevention recommendations in this report.

In its report on Operation Acacia, released on 30 August 2013, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Ian Macdonald, John Maitland, Craig Ransley, Andrew Poole and Michael Chester. The Commission is of the opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of Ian Macdonald, John Maitland, Craig Ransley and Andrew Poole for various offences.

In its corruption prevention report concerning Operations Jasper and Acacia, released on 30 October 2013, the Commission makes 26 recommendations to reduce opportunities and incentives for corruption in the state’s management of coal resources.

On 18 December 2013, the Commission released a separate report dealing with certain matters identified in the Parliamentary terms of reference for Operation Acacia and similar matters identified in the letter of 30 January 2013 from the Premier of NSW in relation to Operation Jasper. The Commission's recommendations in this report include that the NSW Government considers enacting legislation to cancel the coal exploration licences for Doyles Creek, Mount Penny and Glendon Brook.

The ICAC investigated corruption allegations involving Fortunato (Lucky Gattellari) and Ronald Medich offering rewards or inducements to former NSW minister for energy, Ian Macdonald, to arrange meetings with state energy executives.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 31 July 2013, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Mr Macdonald, Mr Medich and Mr Gattellari. The Commission is of the opinion that the advice of the director of public prosecution should be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Macdonald and Mr Medich for specified offences.

The Commission has not made corruption prevention recommendations in this report. The investigation does, however, raise the issue of inappropriate use of influence by a minister. This issue also arises in other investigations in respect of which reports are intended to be released at the same time and will be dealt with, along with other corruption prevention issues, in a separate report.

The ICAC investigated allegations that former University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) employee, Nabil Faysal, engaged in corrupt conduct in his dealings with UTS contractors including by soliciting and accepting money or other benefits from contractors in return for allocating them work, or using his position to influence the allocation of UTS work to them.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 27 March 2013, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Mr Faysal and Wayne Hood. The Commission is of the opinion that the advice of the director of public prosecution should be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Faysal for offences of soliciting and receiving corrupt benefits. The Commission has made three corruption prevention recommendations to UTS to help minimise and prevent the recurrence of such behaviour.

The ICAC investigated allegations that Karaha Pene Te-Hira, an activities officer employed by Corrective Services NSW (CSNSW) at the Long Bay Correctional Complex Metropolitan Special Programs Centre (MSPC), trafficked mobile telephones and accessories, sports shoes, steroids and other contraband into MSPC over the past three years  in return for corrupt payments from inmates or family members or associates of inmates.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 25 January 2013, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Mr Te-Hira, Omar Zahed and Asmahen Zahed. The Commission is of the opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions should be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Te-Hira for offences of corruptly receiving a reward. The Commission has made five corruption prevention recommendations to CSNSW to help minimise and prevent the recurrence of such behaviour.

2012

The ICAC investigated allegations that staff from a number of local councils and other authorities engaged in corrupt conduct by accepting gift vouchers and other gifts from suppliers as an inducement to continue placing orders with their companies or as a reward for placing orders with the companies. The ICAC also investigated allegations that staff from two local councils engaged in corrupt conduct in relation to false invoices to those two councils.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 29 October 2012, the Commission finds that 22 employees or former employees of 14 local councils and another public authority in NSW engaged in corrupt conduct by accepting gift vouchers and other gifts from suppliers as an inducement to continue placing orders with their companies or as a reward for placing orders with the companies. Fifteen staff from four supplier companies were also found to have engaged in corrupt conduct through their involvement in offering these gifts.

The ICAC also finds that two former storepeople, Geoffrey Hadley of Bathurst Regional Council and Kerry Smith of Yass Valley Council, and three suppliers engaged in corrupt conduct in relation to false invoices issued to those two councils in return for cash kickbacks. Under this scheme, Mr Hadley and Mr Smith received combined corrupt payments in excess of $323,000.

The Commission has made 15 corruption recommendations to all councils in NSW, as it is evident that the conduct uncovered during this investigation is systemic and all councils should take action to mitigate these risks.

The ICAC investigated allegations that University of Sydney information technology (IT) manager Atilla “Todd” Demiralay engaged in corrupt conduct by using a business that employed his wife, and later operated through a company in which he and his wife had a financial interest, to recruit contractors and staff for the university, without disclosing his financial interest in the business.

Mr Demiralay was also alleged to have engaged in corrupt conduct by engaging his brother-in-law, friends and candidates put forth by Succuro and Succuro Recruitment Pty Ltd to work at the university.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 24 October 2012, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Mr Demiralay. The Commission is of the opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of Mr Demiralay and his wife, Virginia Kantarzis, for offences of giving false or misleading evidence pursuant to the Independent Commission Against Corruption Act 1988.

The Commission has made seven corruption recommendations to the University of Sydney, including that it should where possible establish a single point of access for employment of IT contractors using multiple recruitment firms in competition.

The ICAC investigated allegations that between March 2005 and April 2006, Ron Mason (former chairperson of the Wagonga Local Aboriginal Land Council) and Ken Foster (former coordinator of the Wagonga Local Aboriginal Land Council) received corrupt benefits from Fortunato (Lucky) Gattellari in return for facilitating negotiations between the Wagonga Local Aboriginal Land Council, Mr Gattellari, Ron Medich Developments Pty Ltd and Waterview Developments Pty Ltd.

The Commission also investigated an allegation that between January 2008 and April 2010, Vanessa Mason (former chairperson and current CEO of the Wagonga Local Aboriginal Land Council) received corrupt benefits from Mr Gattellari in return for facilitating negotiations between the Wagonga Local Aboriginal Land Council, Mr Gattellari and Waterview Developments Pty Ltd.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 27 September 2012, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Fortunato (Lucky) Gattellari, Ron Mason, Ken Foster, Vanessa Mason and Ron Medich. The Commission is of the opinion that the advice of the director of public prosecution should be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Mason, Mr Foster and Ms Mason for various offences. The ICAC has made three corruption prevention recommendations to the Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and the government generally, to help minimise the recurrence of such conduct.

The ICAC investigated allegations that Colin McCallum, Campus Services Manager at the University of New England (UNE) corruptly solicited and received benefits for himself and others in return for improperly favouring Quad Services Pty Ltd, Sydney Night Patrol and Inquiry Pty Ltd (SNP), and Prosys Services Pty Ltd in the awarding of UNE contracts and for approving payment of false invoices submitted by those companies.

Mr McCallum was also alleged to have corruptly arranged for payment for the hire of UNE sports facilities for the use of New England Rugby Union by providing false and misleading information to other UNE employees.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 30 August 2012, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Mr McCallum, and also against Dobrilla Cutler of Quad Services, Martin McLean of SNP and Neville Magi of Prosys Services. The Commission is of the opinion that the advice of the director of public prosecution should be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr McCallum and Mr McLean for various offences. The Commission has made five corruption prevention recommendations to help UNE address weaknesses in its procurement process that were highlighted by the investigation.

The ICAC investigated allegations that between September 2009 and February 2010, Auburn City Councillor Jack Au accepted a cash payment from developer Ms Shu Xian Liang to secure his assistance to expedite approval for a development application she had lodged for a restaurant/karaoke bar.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 14 June 2012, the Commission made corrupt conduct findings against Mr Au and Ms Liang. The Commission is of the opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions should be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Au for specified offences. The ICAC also recommends that consideration be given to the suspension of Mr Au from civic office as a councillor of Auburn City Council with a view to his dismissal for serious corrupt conduct.

The ICAC investigated an allegation that David Johnson, while employed as a Project Manager with the then Department of Education and Training (the DET), between 1 March 2008 and 30 April 2009, engaged in corrupt conduct by improperly causing officers of the DET to appoint persons employed by or otherwise connected with Ogawie Pty Limited (Ogawie), a company operated by Mr Johnson, in order to benefit financially from those appointments.

Mr Johnson was also alleged to have engaged in corrupt conduct through falsely representing to officers of the DET that certain persons had provided services to the DET when, at Mr Johnson's direction, they had provided services to Ogawie, in order to benefit financially from the provision of those services, and by improperly causing officers of the DET to approve and pay for the provision of information technology services by Catalina IT (Catalina), an information technology company, in order to benefit financially from the payments to Catalina.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 18 January 2012, the Commission makes corrupt conduct findings against Mr Johnson. The Commission is of the opinion that the advice of the director of public prosecution with respect to the prosecution of Mr Johnson for specified offences. The Commission has made seven corruption prevention recommendations to the now Department of Education and Communities to help the department address outstanding issues.

2011

The ICAC investigated an allegation that Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority (SHFA) officer Andrew Kelly acted in conflict with his official duties when dealing with Charif Kazal, and members of the Kazal family, in relation to properties which were owned by the SHFA at 91, 99, 100 and 135 George Street, The Rocks, and leased by Kazal family businesses at a time when Mr Kelly was, or anticipated being, involved with Mr Kazal and members of the Kazal family in private business.

The Commission investigated an allegation that Mr Kazal sought to improperly influence the exercise of Mr Kelly’s official functions by holding out the prospect of Mr Kelly being involved with him and members of the Kazal family in private business.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 16 December 2011, the Commission made corrupt conduct findings against Mr Kelly and Mr Kazal. The Commission is of the opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions should be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Kelly and Mr Kazal for specified offences. The ICAC has made four corruption prevention recommendations to help the SHFA improve the robustness of the decision-making process to make it difficult to inappropriately influence the process.

The ICAC investigated allegations that Land and Property Management Authority (LPMA) chief executive officer Warwick Watkins committed the NSW Government to the purchase of property at Currawong, Pittwater, knowing that he did not have the requisite authority to do so, and that the Hon Anthony Kelly, the then minister for lands, sought to authorise the purchase although he knew he was not authorised to do so.

The Commission also examined an allegation that Mr Kelly backdated to 28 February 2011 a letter to Mr Watkins, knowing that it would be used by Mr Watkins to falsely represent that he had written authority of Mr Kelly as of that date to purchase the Currawong property. It is also alleged that Mr Watkins and the LPMA chief financial officer Robert Costello, knowing that the letter dated 28 February 2011 was backdated, used the letter to represent falsely that Mr Watkins had written authority of Mr Kelly as of that date to purchase the property.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 12 December 2011, the Commission made corrupt conduct findings against Mr Watkins, Mr Kelly and Mr Costello. The Commission is of the opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions should be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Watkins, Mr Kelly and Mr Costello for various criminal offences.

The ICAC investigated allegations that Kim Hildebrand, an employee of a company that was providing valuation services to the Valuer General of the Land and Property Management Authority (LPMA), engaged in corrupt conduct in relation to alleged misuse of the authority’s Spatial Information Exchange computer database.

In its report on the investigation, made public on 3 November 2011, the Commission made corrupt conduct findings against Ms Hildebrand, Greg Hildebrand, Angus Algie and James Smith. The Commission is not of the opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions should be sought with respect to the prosecution of any individuals in relation to this matter. The ICAC has made 11 corruption prevention recommendations to Land and Property Information (formerly part of the LPMA) to help prevent such conduct from recurring in the future.

 

The ICAC investigated allegations that Sandra Lazarus and others fraudulently obtained money from the funds of the Royal Hospital for Women and Royal North Shore Hospital by submitting false requisitions and invoices from companies in which she or her sister, Michelle Lazarus, was a shareholder when no services were provided. In its report on this investigation, which was made public on 31 August 2011, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Sandra Lazarus and Michelle Lazarus. The ICAC has stated its opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions be sought with respect to the prosecution of Sandra Lazarus and Michelle Lazarus for various offences. The Commission has also made seven corruption prevention recommendations to the NSW Department of Health to help minimise or prevent such conduct from recurring.

 

The ICAC investigated allegations that Willoughby City Council employee, Edward Karkowski, corruptly exercised his official functions in favour of various business owners within the Council area in return for financial and other benefits.In its report on this investigation, which was made public on 22 June 2011, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Mr Karkowski.The ICAC has stated its opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Karkowski for various offences. The Commission has also made seven corruption prevention recommendations. Six of the recommendations are made to Willoughby City Council, and one recommendation is made to the Department of Planning and Infrastructure.

 

The ICAC investigated an allegation that Strathfield Council’s Community Services Manager, Michael Chau, solicited a payment of $10,000 from Phillip Armstrong of Tenix Solutions for his own benefit. In its report on this investigation, which was made public on 12 May 2011, the ICAC made a finding of corrupt conduct against Mr Chau.

The ICAC has stated its opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of Mr Chau for an offence of soliciting a corrupt payment under section 249B(1) of the Crimes Act 1900.

The Commission has also stated opinion that consideration should be given to the taking of action against Mr Chau with a view to dismissing, dispensing with the services of or otherwise terminating his services on the grounds that he engaged in described misconduct.

The ICAC conducted an investigation into whether Pasquale (Pat) Romano, the former General Manager of Burwood Council, and other Council officers, engaged in corrupt conduct in the course of their administration of staff and use of resources at the Council.

In its report on this investigation, which was made public on 20 April 2011, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Mr Romano.

The ICAC has stated its opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Romano for various offences.

The Commission has also made 31 corruption prevention recommendations. Some of the recommendations are made to Burwood Council, while others are made to the NSW Government to help improve systems in local government across the state.

The ICAC investigated whether various Sydney Water Corporation (SWC) inspectors sought corrupt payments or rewards from contractors in relation to the performance of their SWC duties. The Commission also investigated an allegation that then SWC Property Asset Manager Edward Harvey engaged in corrupt conduct in dealings with Paul Makucha and associated companies.

In its report on this investigation, which was made public on 22 March 2011, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against nine individuals including Messrs Harvey and Makucha, plus former Sydney Water employees Kenneth John Buckley, Bryan Kane, Richard Fayers, Robert Funovski and Anthony Vecchio, current employee Robert Rodgers, and constructor John Gerard Ryan.

The ICAC has stated its opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions be sought with respect to the prosecution of Messrs Buckley, Funovski, Kane, Harvey and Makucha for various offences. The Commission has also made 18 corruption prevention recommendations to assist Sydney Water to prevent similar conduct from occurring in the future.

2010

The ICAC investigated an allegation that Hedley Peter Higgs, Manager of City Services at Canada Bay City Council, accepted payments from contractors engaged to conduct work for the Council, in return for showing favour to those contractors in the course of his work with Council.

In its report on this investigation, which was made public on 15 December 2010, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Mr Higgs and contractor Thomas David Turner.

The ICAC has stated its opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Higgs and Mr Turner for various offences. The Commission has also made five corruption prevention recommendations to assist the Council to prevent similar conduct from occurring in the future.

The Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) conducted an investigation into whether Angela D’Amore, MP and members of her electorate office staff, falsely claimed payments from the NSW Parliament with respect to the Sitting Day Relief entitlement in the period 29 August 2006 to 29 June 2007.

In its report on this investigation, which was made public on 7 December 2010, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Ms D’Amore and her electorate staff member Agatha La Manna .The ICAC has stated its opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions should be sought with respect to the prosecution of Ms D’Amore for two common law offences of misconduct in public office.

The ICAC conducted an investigation into the lobbying of public officials and public authorities in NSW and the related procedures and regulatory system.

In its report on this investigation, which was made public on 10 November 2010, the ICAC made 17 recommendations to improve the regulation of lobbying in NSW.

This investigation differed from those usually conducted by the Commission in that it was not concerned with whether any particular individual had engaged in corrupt conduct. Rather, it examined the corruption risks involved in the lobbying of public authorities and officials.

As part of the investigation, the Commission released a discussion paper in May 2010, and held a public inquiry during August this year at which 48 witnesses from various sectors voluntarily gave evidence.

Lobbying in NSW - issues paper 

 

The ICAC conducted an investigation into the conduct of Deborah Yandell, Site Manager, Campus Infrastructure Services, University of Sydney concerning the alleged failure to disclose conflicts of interest arising out of allocation of cleaning contracts to Razorback Services Pty Ltd, a company jointly owned by her and her husband, Dino Radovac.

The investigation report, made public on 8 September 2010, details ICAC findings made against Ms Yandell. 

The Commission is not of the opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) should be sought with respect to prosecuting Ms Yandell or Mr Radovac for any criminal offences. 

The Commission made five corruption prevention recommendations to the University of Sydney to help minimise or prevent similar conduct occurring in the future in procurement and contracting.

The ICAC conducted an investigation into the conduct of Tonette Kelly, Manager Legal Branch/Acting General Counsel, and other officers of the Maritime Authority of NSW (NSW Maritime), including the alleged misuse of the resources of NSW Maritime for the benefit of Ms Kelly.

In its report on this investigation, which was made public on 1 September 2010, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Ms Kelly, Bonita (Bonnie) Dacombe and Nicholai Dacombe.

The ICAC has stated its opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions be sought with respect to the prosecution of Ms Kelly for various offences and Mr Dacombe for giving false evidence to the Commission. The Commission has also made seven corruption prevention recommendations to NSW Maritime to help minimise or prevent similar conduct occurring in the future.

The Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) conducted an investigation into whether Sisira Kumara Kumaragamage Don (also known as Don Gamage), engaged in corrupt conduct by offering a payment to secure employment at Woollahra Municipal Council.

In its report on this investigation, which was made public on 12 August 2010, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Mr Gamage.

The ICAC has stated its opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Gamage for various offences. The Commission has also made four corruption prevention recommendations to Coonamble Shire Council and Cobar Shire Council, most of which are relevant to all NSW public authorities, to minimise or prevent similar conduct occurring in the future.

The ICAC conducted an investigation into whether Sebastian Wade, a Senior Corrective Services Officer with the Department of Corrective Services (Corrective Services NSW), and others supplied contraband including drugs and mobile telephones to inmates of the John Morony Correctional Centre in return for payment.

In its report on this investigation, which was made public on 27 July 2010, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Mr Wade.The ICAC has stated its opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Wade for various offences and has made 14 corruption prevention recommendations to minimise or prevent similar conduct occurring in the future.

The ICAC conducted an investigation into the conduct of the former Member of Parliament for Penrith, Karyn Paluzzano, including allegations that she and other members of her electorate office staff falsely claimed payments from the New South Wales Parliament with respect to the Sitting Day Relief entitlement and the Electorate Mailout Account.

In its report on this investigation, which was made public on 13 July 2010, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Ms Paluzzano and her former electorate staff Timothy Horan, Jennifer Launt and Kerrie Donlan. The ICAC has stated its opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mrs Paluzzano for specified offences and has made two corruption prevention recommendations to minimise or prevent similar conduct occurring in the future.

The ICAC investigated whether Garrie Cooper, a head carpentry teacher employed by the NSW Department of Education and Training at the Miller College of TAFE, and others engaged in corrupt conduct by misusing TAFE resources for their personal gain.

In its report on this investigation, which was made public on 10 June 2010, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Mr Cooper and three self-employed tradesmen, Anthony Fox, Keith Melia and Khai Van Tran. The ICAC has stated its opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Cooper for specified offences and has made a total of eight corruption prevention recommendations to minimise or prevent similar conduct occurring in the future.

The ICAC investigated allegations of corruption involving a former Housing NSW officer, Frank Garzaniti, and his associate, Frank Santomingo. The allegations included that between 2001 and 2008 Mr Garzaniti failed to disclose an interest in Department of Housing contracts that were awarded to, or related to work that was carried out by, companies he and Mr Santomingo had interests in, which enabled himself and Mr Santomingo to benefit financially.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 2 June 2010, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against Mr Garzaniti and stated its opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions be sought with respect to his prosecution for the common law offence of misconduct in public office.

The ICAC conducted an investigation into whether David Pyo engaged in corrupt conduct by giving a benefit to a Strathfield Council employee as an inducement for facilitating negotiations for a licence agreement for a Council property.

In its investigation report, made public on 13 May 2010, the Commission found that Mr Pyo had engaged in corrupt conduct and stated its opinion that the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions be sought with respect to the prosecution of Mr Pyo for an offence of offering a corrupt benefit. The Commission also made six corruption prevention recommendations.

The Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) investigated allegations of corrupt conduct principally arising from:

  • an audio recording made by Mr Michael McGurk of a conversation in which a representation was made that a corrupt payment could be made to a senior public official with respect to a proposed development; and
  • various statements alleged to have been made by Mr Michael McGurk to various people relating to corrupt conduct by NSW public officials and others, including but not limited to, conduct in relation to the possible re-zoning of property at Badgerys Creek.
In its report on this investigation, made public on 25 March 2010, the ICAC stated that it found that the allegations investigated were without substance. No findings of corrupt conduct were made.

The ICAC investigated allegations that John Hart, a barrister, together with a number of other persons, engaged in corrupt conduct by providing false information to judicial officers, conspiring to deliberately inflate legal costs in a costs claim lodged with the Attorney-General’s Department and representing to his clients and others that in return for payment being made to public officials in the justice system, those public officials would act favourably in their interests.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 15 March 2010, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Mr Hart, solicitor Anthony Paul and three other persons, Jason Kelly, Christopher Trinder and Jeffrey Nankivell. Recommendations are made that consideration be given to the prosecution of Messrs Hart, Paul, Kelly, Trinder and Nankivell and to the taking of disciplinary action under the Legal Profession Act 2004 against Mr Hart and Mr Paul. No corruption prevention recommendations are made in this report.

2009

The ICAC investigated allegations that persons from various registered training organisations, and others, may have engaged in corrupt conduct, and/or conduct liable to allow, encourage or cause the occurrence of corrupt conduct, in relation to the delivery of training, the conduct of assessments and the issue of certificates connected with approved security industry training courses.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 9 December 2009, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against 10 persons and recommended that consideration be given to the prosecution of eight persons for specified criminal offences and to the revocation of security licences held by two persons. A total of 16 corruption prevention recommendations are made to address fundamental regulatory problems in the security industry.

The ICAC investigated allegations that former Sydney Ferries Corporation Chief Executive Officer, Geoffrey Smith, engaged in corrupt conduct by misusing the Corporation’s financial resources.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 4 November 2009, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Mr Smith. The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of Mr Smith and of Vincenzo Rossello, a former Sydney Ferries Chief Financial Officer, for specified offences. Four corruption prevention recommendations were made to Sydney Ferries.

The ICAC investigated allegations that a former RailCorp employee, Wasim Khan, and his associates, Mohammed Ali and Tabrez Khan, engaged in corrupt conduct by attempting to solicit $200,000 over four years in return for awarding a RailCorp security guard auditing services contract.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 24 September 2009, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Wasim Khan, Mr Ali and Tabrez Khan and recommended that consideration be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of public prosecutions with respect to their prosecution for specified offences.

The ICAC investigated whether Goran Pevec, an officer of the state-owned corporation TransGrid, showed corrupt favour to Domenic Murdocca and/or his firm Sage Civil Engineering Pty Ltd in return for the provision of benefits, and whether Domenic Murdocca, and others working for Sage, defrauded TransGrid in the process of tendering for and performing contractual work with TransGrid.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 9 September 2009, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Goran Pevec and Domenic Murdocca and stated its opinion that consideration be give to obtaining the advice of the DPP with respect to the prosecution of Mr Murdocca, Mr Pevec and Linda Pevec for specified offences. Six corruption prevention recommendations were made to TransGrid. 

The ICAC investigated allegations that business owners Jin Hua Chen and Yu Ling Sun had engaged in corrupt conduct by offering cash payments to two Warringah Council employees in order to facilitate council building inspection approval of their business premises.

The ICAC's report on this investigation, made public on 30 June 2009, made corrupt conduct findings against Jin Hua Chen and Yu Ling Sun.

The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of Mr Chen and Ms Sun for offences of corruptly offering an inducement contrary to section 249B(2) of the Crimes Act 1900 (NSW).

The ICAC investigated whether Diana Huang and Wing Mak engaged in corrupt conduct by giving corrupt benefits to Katharine Hawken, an officer at Ku-ring-gai Council.

Ms Hawken was involved with assessing planning applications concerned with a subdivision and development of a property that was owned by a company of which Mr Mak was a director and shareholder. Ms Huang worked for Mr Mak.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 26 February 2009, the ICAC found that Ms Huang engaged in corrupt conduct and stated its opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to her prosecution for offences of corruptly offering an inducement contrary to section 249B(2) of the Crimes Act 1900 (NSW).

The ICAC made three corruption prevention recommendations - one to the Department of Local Government and two to Ku-ring-gai Council.  

The ICAC investigated allegations that Xiaodong Lu and Qinghua Pei paid money to a Westmead Public School teacher to help ensure entry into a selective public high school for their son.

The ICAC's report on this investigation, made public on 12 February 2009, made corrupt conduct findings against Ms Lu and Mr Pei. The ICAC found that in making the payments, they were improperly seeking to directly influence the school’s internal assessment marks to be awarded to their son to improve his prospects of admission to a selective high school.

The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of Ms Lu and Mr Pei for offences of offering a corrupt benefit contrary to section 249B(2) of the Crimes Act 1900 (NSW).

2008

The ICAC investigated whether project managers and others engaged in corrupt conduct in relation to the awarding and management of NSW Fire Brigades (NSWFB) capital works and maintenance projects.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 18 December 2008, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against Christian Sanhueza, Clive Taylor, Rasem Guirguis, Soliman Hanna and Patricia Xuereb.

The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of Mr Sanhueza, Mr Taylor and his wife Annamarie Taylor, Mr Guirguis and Ms Xuereb for various criminal offences.

A total of 14 corruption prevention recommendations were made to the NSWFB to support and complement its existing initiatives.

The ICAC investigated allegations that former and current officials of Wollongong City Council and developers engaged in corrupt conduct in relation to the assessment of development applications and a range of other matters.

Part 1 of the Commission’s report on this investigation, made public on 4 March 2008, made a recommendation under section 74C(1) of the ICAC Act that consideration be given to the making of a proclamation under the Local Government Act 1993 that all civic offices in relation to Wollongong City Council be declared vacant.

Part 2 of the report, made public on 28 May 2008, made a recommendation under section 74C(3B) of the ICAC Act that consideration be given to the suspension of the development consent granted by the Council on 18 August 2005 for a proposed $100 million development known as “Quattro” with a view to its revocation because of serious corrupt conduct in connection with the grant of the consent.

Part 3 of the report, made public on 8 October 2008, made corrupt conduct findings against Beth Morgan, a former member of Council staff; two property developers, Frank Vellar and Bulent Tabak;  three of Ms Morgan’s superiors at Council, former General Manager Rod Oxley and former senior managers Joe Scimone and John Gilbert; and former Councillors Valerio Zanotto, Kiril Jonovski, Zeki Esen and Frank Gigliotti.

The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of 11 persons for specified criminal offences and made a total of 27 corruption prevention recommendations – two to the Minister for Planning, four to the Department of Planning, one to all NSW local councils and 20 to Wollongong City Council.

The ICAC investigated allegations that RailCorp employees and contractors acted fraudulently and/or engaged in bribery in relation to the procurement of goods and services.

The ICAC's first and second reports were made public in August 2008, the third, fourth, fifth and sixth reports in September 2008, the seventh report in November 2008 and the eighth report, which addressed corruption prevention issues, was made public in December 2008.

The ICAC made 96 findings of corrupt conduct against 31 people in relation to all segments of this investigation, and stated its opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of 33 individuals for a total of 663 criminal offences.

The final report made 40 corruption prevention recommendations about changes to RailCorp’s structure, practices and procedures aimed at reducing opportunities for similar corrupt conduct to occur, or continue to occur.

The ICAC investigated whether Department of Housing Senior Client Services Officer Doug Norris corruptly solicited and received cash payments from prospective tenants to fast-track their applications as part of a scheme in which he collaborated with tenants Bruce Murray and Gary Hogan.

In its investigation report, made public on 31 January 2008, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Messrs Norris, Murray and Hogan, and six other persons who were involved in paying money to Mr Norris in return for receiving public housing allocations.

The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of Messrs Norris, Murray and Hogan, and Christopher Peters and Ethel Nolan for various offences. The ICAC made a total of 18 corruption prevention recommendations to the Department of Housing.

2007

This report concerned an investigation by the ICAC into an allegation that developer Lou Tasich attempted to bribe Wollongong City Councils Manager Commercial Projects and Property, Peter Coyte, by offering Mr Coyte $30,000 to favourably treat Mr Tasich's proposal to purchase and develop a Council property known as the Thomas Street car park.

The ICAC also examined a counter-allegation by Mr Tasich that Mr Coyte had attempted to solicit a bribe from him, and the reasons for the delay by Rod Oxley, former General Manager of the Council, in reporting the alleged bribe to the ICAC in accordance with his obligation under section 11 of the ICAC Act.

In its report on this investigation, made public in December 2007, the ICAC made a finding of corrupt conduct against Mr Tasich and stated its opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to his prosecution for specified criminal offences.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of Scott Freeman, a former council officer at Bankstown and Strathfield councils, and contractor Terence Stepto.

The investigation focused on a scheme where Mr Freeman favoured a contractor by forging quotes and arranging for Mr Stepto to submit dummy quotes to falsely demonstrate he had followed council procurement procedures.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 15 November 2007, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Mr Freeman and Mr Stepto but stated its opinion that, due to the lack of available admissible evidence, consideration should not be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to their prosecution for any criminal offence. Four corruption prevention recommendations were made to Bankstown and Strathfield councils.

The ICAC investigated allegations that a Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) officer, Paul McPherson, and others engaged in corrupt conduct in relation to issuing driver licences.

In its investigation report, made public on 20 September 2007, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against Mr McPherson, Victor Phomsavanh and Komate Jaturawong who facilitated the scheme and 22 other persons. The ICAC was of the opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of Messrs McPherson, Phomsavanh and Jaturawong for specified criminal offences and that the RTA consider disciplinary action against Mr McPherson. A total of 22 corruption prevention recommendations were made to the RTA.

The ICAC investigated allegations that a compliance officer at the Parramatta City Council, Wade Fryar, solicited and received corrupt rewards in connection with the exercise of his official functions.

In its investigation report, made public on 22 August 2007, the ICAC found that Mr Fryar and 10 brothel operators and prostitutes engaged in corrupt conduct. The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of Mr Fryar and 10 other persons for criminal offences.

Thirteen corruption prevention recommendations were made – 10 to Parramatta City Council and three to the NSW Minister for Planning and the NSW Attorney General.

The ICAC investigated whether Said Marcos, a RailCorp employee, received corrupt rewards from RailCorp contractors Tony Mourched and Sami Mikhail in return for the awarding RailCorp air-conditioning maintenance and other work to them.

In its investigation report, made public on 18 June 2007, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Mr Marcos, Mr Mourched and Mr Mikhail. The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to their prosecution, and also that of Benjamin Marcos, for specified criminal offences.

A total of 27 corruption prevention recommendations were made to RailCorp.

The ICAC conducted an investigation and systems review of corruption risks associated with HSC take-home assessment tasks. The ICAC's investigation focused on the provision of tutoring services by a private tutoring business, Acclaim Education, and on the review and analysis of the applicable regulatory frameworks and organisational policies, procedures and practices.  

No finding of corrupt conduct was made. However, the ICAC’s investigation made it apparent that there were several corruption risk areas which needed to be addressed by the relevant public authorities.

In its investigation report, released on 1 March 2007, the ICAC made a total of 20 corruption prevention recommendations, 14 directed to the Board of Studies NSW, five to the Department of Education and Training and one to the Minister for Education and Training. 

2006

The ICAC investigated allegations that a Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) officer, Damon Job and contractor Terence Stepto had defrauded the RTA in relation to payments for provision of traffic "tidal flow" services and RailCorp in relation to payments for traffic management services during rail shutdowns.

In its investigation report, made public on 21 December 2006, the Commission made findings of corrupt conduct against Mr Job and Mr Stepto. The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of Mr Job and Mr Stepto for specified criminal offences.

A total of 30 corruption prevention recommendations were made - 16 to the RTA and 14 to RailCorp.

The ICAC investigated suspected corrupt conduct by a former public official, two real estate agents and possibly others in relation to the sale of surplus properties by the former Home Purchase Assistance Authority and the NSW Department of Housing.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 26 October 2006, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against Graham Wade, a former officer of the Home Purchase Assistance Authority and the NSW Department of Housing and real estate agents John Ashe and Ken Williams. The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to their prosecution for various offences. The ICAC also made four corruption prevention recommendations to the Department of Housing.

The ICAC investigated allegations that an employee of the Department of Corrective Services and others engaged in corrupt conduct in connection with the case management of community service orders (CSO).

In its investigation report, made public on 20 September 2006, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Michael Ishac, a CSO organiser at the Bankstown office of the Probation and Parole Service; CSO offenders John Tourni, Brian Khouzame, Rabi Jaouhar and Lawrence Carpenter; and community service work supervisors Father Elias Khoury, Faride Hilal, Albert Bullen and Hammurabi Barhy.

The ICAC stated its opinion that the advice of the DPP should be obtained with respect to the prosecution of Mr Ishac, Mr Tourni, Mr Khouzame, Father Khoury, Ms Hilal, Mr Barhy and Mr Bullen for specified offences, and made 24 corruption prevention recommendations to the Department of Corrective Services to address deficiencies in the CSO scheme.

The ICAC investigated a number of allegations of corrupt conduct involving bribery relating to Burwood Council.

It was alleged that the Mayor, John Faker and former mayor David Weiley, were bribed to approve development applications.

It was also alleged that Cr Faker and Cr Weiley received these bribes whilst travelling to Lebanon on a Council-funded trip with developers in August and September 2004, that Cr Faker and Cr Weiley deceived Burwood Council about key aspects of the trip to Lebanon and that the reimbursement of their flight costs was inappropriate.

The ICAC also investigated complaints that Cr Faker had failed to properly disclose pecuniary interests relating to Council business.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 7 August 2006, the ICAC made no findings of corrupt conduct against any person. The report made five corruption prevention recommendations - two to Burwood Council in relation to its overseas travel policy and the disclosure of non-pecuniary conflicts of interest, and three to the Department of Local Government in relation to the disclosure and management of pecuniary interests.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of correctional officers employed by the Department of Corrective Services (DCS) correctional officers  in relation to an alleged cover-up of the assault of an inmate at Parramatta Correctional Centre (PCC) on 4 August 2005.

In its investigation report, made public on 8 June 2006, the ICAC found that the acting Deputy Governor of the PCC, Jeffrey Strange, engaged in corrupt conduct and stated its opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of Mr Strange and another DCS officer, Shannon Wade.

The ICAC also made 16 corruption prevention recommendations to the DCS to minimise the risk of such conduct reoccurring.

The ICAC investigated an allegation that confidential information in a draft Cabinet minute, prepared by the Roads and Traffic Authority, about costs associated with the proposed relocation of the Sydney Cross City Motorway tunnel ventilation stack, was provided to a motorway consortium by a contractor employed by the Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority.

The ICAC's report on this investigation, made public on 19 April 2006, made no findings of corrupt conduct against any person. One corruption prevention recommendation was made, that the NSW Cabinet Office provide guidelines for public sector agencies about the security required for draft Cabinet material.

The ICAC investigated whether Faraj Harb, an officer of the Local Court Registry at Penrith, had sought money from defendants in proceedings before the Local Court and other persons in return for purported assistance in relation to those proceedings.

The ICAC's report on this investigation, made public on 28 February 2006, made findings of corrupt conduct against Mr Harb and stated the opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of Mr Harb and an associate, Joseph Ghanem, and that the Attorney-General's Department should consider disciplinary action against Mr Harb. Twelve corruption prevention recommendations were made to the Attorney-General's Department to address weaknesses in information security policies and systems.

2005

The ICAC investigated a number of schemes which exploited weaknesses in the licensing system in order to fraudulently obtain contractor licences for residential building and building trade work.

In its investigation report, made public on 20 December 2005, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against 36 persons and stated its opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of each of these persons. The report made a total of 24 corruption prevention recommendations to the Office of Fair Trading, the Building Industry Skills Centre, the Department of Education and Training in relation to TAFE and TAFE Plus, the Minister for Education and Training and the Vocational Education and Training Accreditation Board.

The ICAC investigated the issuing of thousands of false certificates of competency through the Certification Unit of the WorkCover Authority of NSW (WorkCover). The investigation established that certificates were issued without the applicants having undergone any assessment process and that false certificates were sold and disseminated through a network of distributors.

The ICAC's report on this investigation, made public on 14 December 2005, made findings of corrupt conduct against 23 persons, including three former WorkCover employees, 16 distributors of the certificates and four applicants for the false certificates.

The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration should be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of 18 of these individuals for specified offences, and made 19 corruption prevention recommendations to WorkCover NSW.

The ICAC investigated alleged misconduct within the South Western Sydney Area Health Service (SWSAHS), alleged mistreatment of persons who complained about such conduct and associated circumstances.

The ICAC produced two reports on this investigation.

The first report, made public on 13 April 2005, dealt with allegations that the former NSW Minister for Health, the Hon Craig Knowles MP, mistreated nurses who brought complaints to him. The second report, made public on 22 September 2005, dealt with a large number of separate allegations made by three nurses and a number of other persons, most of whom were employees of the SWSAHS. None of the allegations investigated by the ICAC were ultimately substantiated.

No findings of corrupt conduct or related recommendations were made in either report.

The ICAC investigated the original development consent granted by Liverpool City Council for the Orange Grove warehouse clearance outlet, and the circumstances surrounding the refusal by the Minister Assisting the Minister for Infrastructure and Planning (Planning Administration), the Hon Diane Beamer MP, to approve an amendment to the draft Liverpool Local Environmental Plan relating to the Orange Grove centre.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 11 August 2005, the ICAC made no corrupt conduct findings against any person.

Three corruption prevention recommendations were made in the report, two to the NSW Government and one to the then Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Natural Resources.

The ICAC investigated the handling by the University of Newcastle of allegations of plagiarism by students at an offshore campus of the University’s Graduate School of Business.

The investigation established that Dr Paul Ryder, the then head of the Graduate School, failed to apply the University’s then-current plagiarism policy and failed to undertake any proper investigation of the original plagiarism allegations, in breach of his obligations, and that Professor Roger Holmes (the then Vice-Chancellor of the University) and Professor Brian English (the University’s Deputy Vice-Chancellor) had failed to fully and properly advise the Academic Senate, the Senior Executive Group or the Council of the University of the matter.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 30 June 2005, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Dr Ryder and his then Deputy, Dr Robert Rugimbana.

The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration should not be given to the prosecution of any individual for specified criminal offences and stated its opinion that the Vice-Chancellor of the University should give consideration to the taking of disciplinary action (but not dismissal) against Professor English.

The report also made five corruption prevention recommendations to the University of Newcastle, relating to assessment policy, policy compliance, administrative capacity, internal investigative capacity and risk management.

The ICAC investigated circumstances surrounding the payment of money to the then Mayor of Strathfield, Alfred Tsang, by Melhem (Michael) Saklaoui, including the relationships between certain councillors, developers and others in relation to property developments.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 23 June 2005, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Mr Tsang, Mr Saklaoui, Strathfield councillor John Abi-Saab and then-serving NSW police officer Scott Allman. The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of these four persons, and also of Geoffrey Howe and Anne Bechara, for specified offences. No corruption prevention recommendations were made.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of certain officers of the Koompahtoo Local Aboriginal Land Council in relation to certain property dealings, which took place between approximately 1997 and 2002.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 1 April 2005, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings in relation to Bill Smith, former Chairperson of KLALC; Adam Perkins, a director of Sanpine Pty Ltd; Robert Scott, a consultant and project manager; Graham Steer, a chartered accountant and director of Sanpine; Robert Briggs, former Co-ordinator of KLALC; Stephen Griffen, former Treasurer of  KLALC; Dale Holt, former Development Manager with Villa World Limited and Kim Wilson, a native title and land rights consultant.

The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of Bill Smith, Stephen Griffen, Dale Holt, Adam Perkins, Robert Scott and Kim Wilson for specified offences.

The ICAC also made seven corruption prevention recommendations to the State Government to reduce the risk of corrupt conduct in relation to the holding of land by Aboriginal land councils in NSW.

2004

The ICAC investigated the alleged misuse of Parliamentary allowances and resources by the Hon Peter Breen MLC.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 17 December 2004, the ICAC made no findings of corrupt conduct against any person. Ten corruption prevention recommendations were made to the NSW Parliament to prevent any misuse of the parliamentary entitlements system.

The ICAC investigated fraudulent applications for the enrolment of 24 overseas full-fee paying students at the University of Sydney in 2003.

All of these applications involved forged documents showing students had graduated from the Foundation Studies course at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) when they had not, or that students had attained a higher mark in the Foundation Studies course than they actually achieved.

The ICAC was unable to identify the core offenders, its investigation hindered by a delay by University of Sydney staff in promptly reporting the fraud. It has recommended the University ensure all staff are familiar with procedures to promptly report suspected corrupt conduct.

In its report on this investigation, provided to the NSW Minister for Education and Training under section 14(2) of the ICAC Act on 15 October 2004 and subsequently made public, the ICAC did not make findings of corrupt conduct against any person and did not state an opinion that consideration should be given to the prosecution of, or taking of disciplinary action against, any person. 

The report examined the relevant policies and procedures at the University of Sydney and at UNSW, and made 10 corruption prevention recommendations to these two universities to address corruption risks associated with overseas students programs, the use of agents and enrolment procedures, and to improve understanding of and compliance with reporting requirements.

The ICAC investigated allegations that Shane Hughes, a corrections officer was taking contraband into the Metropolitan Remand and Reception Centre at Silverwater Correctional Complex.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 2 September 2004, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct in relation to Mr Hughes. On 21 June 2004 Mr Hughes pleaded guilty to offences under the Summary Offences Act 1988 and the Crimes Act 1900 and was convicted. In its report the ICAC stated its opinion that consideration need not be given to his prosecution for any other specified offences.

The ICAC made five corruption prevention recommendations to the Department of Corrective Services to assist it to minimise the entry of contraband into correctional centres.

The ICAC investigated the activities of assessors accredited to WorkCover NSW to conduct competency assessments and OH&S training for operators of heavy plant and equipment.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 30 June 2004, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against six persons formerly employed by WorkCover NSW as accredited assessors: Alan Roy Fizelle, Armando Fassone, Andrew Alexander Williams, John Arthur Webb, Brian Cecil Hill and Alexander Dougall and also against Raymond William Anthony, who was formerly accredited by WorkCover NSW as a trainer.

The ICAC stated that consideration should be given to the prosecution of these seven persons, and also against Terry Donald Whyte, the Managing Director of Whyco Crane Services Pty Ltd, for specified offences.

In its report the ICAC also made 14 corruption prevention recommendations to WorkCover NSW to addressed identified corruption risks.

The ICAC investigated possible misuse of parliamentary entitlements in 2003 by a member of the NSW Parliament and former Minister, the Hon J. Richard Face, and statements made by him concerning that conduct (Operation Wingate).

In its report on this investigation, made public on 16 June 2004, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against Mr Face in relation to his misuse of parliamentary resources and making a false and misleading statement to the ICAC. The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration be given to his prosecution for specified offences. In its report the ICAC also made 10 corruption prevention recommendations to the NSW Parliament.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of a corrections officer in relation to the introduction of contraband into the High Risk Management Unit at Goulburn Correctional Centre.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 26 February 2004, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against the corrections officer, Cale David Urosevic, and stated that consideration should be given to his prosecution for specified offences. The ICAC also made six corruption prevention recommendations to the Department of Corrective Services to address the entry into and control of contraband in correctional centres and to enhance corruption resistance across the correctional centre system.

The ICAC investigated whether any person deliberately misreported or dishonestly manipulated hospital waiting list data at Prince of Wales, St George, St Vincents, Sydney/Sydney Eye and Bankstown Hospitals and the two area health services responsible for those hospitals - South Eastern Sydney and South Western Sydney Area Health Services.

In its report on this investigation, made to the NSW Department of Health on 13 February 2004 under section 14(2) of the ICAC Act and subsequently made public, the ICAC made no findings of corrupt conduct against any person. The ICAC made nine corruption prevention recommendations to the Department of Health to address identified deficiencies in waiting list guidelines.

2003

The ICAC investigated the circumstances in which an individual falsely claimed to have certain academic qualifications when applying for various public and private sector positions between 1987 and 2002.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 3 December 2003, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against the individual and stated its opinion that consideration be given to prosecution of the individual for specified offences. The report also made four corruption prevention recommendations relating to NSW public sector recruitment policies and procedures.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report on NSW public sector - use of fraudulent qualifications (Operation Bosco).

The ICAC investigated the authenticity of qualifications and related documents submitted as part of certain applications to the Department of Fair Trading (DFT) for building and trade licences.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 6 November 2003, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against an individual who fraudulently submitted applications to DFT for building and trade licences on behalf of a number of applicants. The Commission stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of the individual for specified offences and that the Attorney-General consider removing them from the position of justice of the peace. In its report the ICAC also made five corruption prevention recommendations to the Department of Fair Trading to address identified risks in licence application processes.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report on Department of Fair Trading - applications for building and trade licences (Operation Squirrel).

The ICAC investigated the conduct of officers of Integral Energy in relation to the award of contracts and tenders for the disposal of goods and services, including decommissioned transformers.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 29 September 2003, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against a former Integral Energy employee and stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of the former employee for specified offences. Four corruption prevention recommendations were made to Integral Energy.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report on investigation into the conduct of an officer of Integral Energy (Operation Grenache).

The ICAC investigated the theft of zoological specimens from the Australian Museum between 1997 and 2002.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 24 September 2003, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against a former employee of the Museum, and stated its opinion that consideration be given to prosecution of the former employee for specified offences. The ICAC also made 33 corruption prevention recommendations to the Australian Museum.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report on investigation into the theft of zoological specimens from the Australian Museum.

The ICAC investigated whether any person engaged in corrupt conduct in relation to actions arising from reports submitted to the Rail Infrastructure Corporation (RIC) recommending closure of Menangle Bridge to rail traffic.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 4 September 2003, the ICAC made no findings of corrupt conduct against any person and stated its opinion that consideration should not be given to the prosecution of, or taking of disciplinary action against, any person. Four corruption prevention recommendations were made to the RIC to improve reporting and accountability procedures and systems, and enhance the RIC's ability to effectively demonstrate rail infrastructure is safe for public use.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report on investigation into conduct of the Rail Infrastructure Corporation and others in relation to Menangle Bridge.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of certain officers of the NSW Grains Board in relation to the cover-up of losses by senior managers, currency speculation and profiteering by the former Queensland regional manager.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 28 August 2003, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against four persons and stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of three of those persons for specified offences.

The ICAC's investigation identified five integrity risks of particular relevance to public sector boards operating in a commercial environment.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report on investigation into the conduct of certain officers of the NSW Grains Board.

 

The ICAC investigated whether a member of the Legislative Council (MLC) had misused parliamentary entitlements and allowances.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 10 July 2003, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against the MLC and stated its opinion that consideration be given to their prosecution for specified offences and to their expulsion from the Legislative Council.

Three corruption prevention recommendations were made to the NSW Parliamentary administration to improve the administration and auditing of parliamentary entitlements.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report on an investigation into the conduct of the Hon. Malcolm Jones MLC.

 

The ICAC investigated the conduct of an employee of Resitech, a service agency of the Department of Housing (DOH), and his dealings with the construction firm Australian Colour Enterprises Pty Ltd.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 29 May 2003, the ICAC made no findings of corrupt conduct against any person, but found that the employee had failed to manage a conflict of interest in compliance with the Department of Housing's Code of Conduct, and stated its opinion that the Department of Housing should give consideration to taking disciplinary action against the employee.

In its report the ICAC made five corruption prevention recommendations to Resitech to improve its tendering policies and procedures.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report on Department of Housing - conflicts of interest.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of an officer of the Department of Housing (DOH) in handling and processing applications for priority public housing.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 15 May 2003, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against the DOH officer and a DOH tenant. The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of both individuals for specified offences and that the DOH give consideration to taking disciplinary action against the DOH officer.

In its report the ICAC also made 13 corruption prevention recommendations to the DOH.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report on Department of Housing - handling of applications for priority public housing.

The ICAC investigated whether any person engaged in corrupt conduct in relation to a proposed development of a club and hotel facility for the Bulldogs Leagues Club at Woodward Park, Liverpool.

The investigation focused on two main issues:

  • whether any person solicited or offered to make a financial contribution to the Australian Labor Party in return for obtaining Government support for any aspect of the development, and
  • the involvement of Liverpool City Council staff in the development, and in particular whether any Council officer or other person acted corruptly in relation to that involvement.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 27 February 2003, the ICAC made no findings that any person engaged in corrupt conduct, and stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of one of the witnesses who gave evidence for an offence under section 87 of the ICAC Act of giving false or misleading evidence to the ICAC.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report on investigation into conduct concerning the Woodward Park project.

2002

The ICAC investigated the conduct of officers of the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) and other persons in relation to the unauthorised alteration of academic records, appropriateness of granting subject exemptions and alterations to computerised student records.

In its report on this investigation, made public in August 2002, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against a former student liaison officer and nine students. The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of the student liaison officer for specified offences and the prosecution of one of the students for an offence under section 87 of the ICAC Act.

The ICAC made a number of corruption prevention recommendations to UTS, grouped under eight headings: specific e-corruption strategies, leadership, code of conduct, complaint handling, gifts and benefits, training and development, external environment and risk management.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report on University of Technology, Sydney - fraudulent alteration of student records.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of two Rockdale City Council councillors and their dealings with property developers and two intermediaries. The investigation also examined whether donations to a political organisation were sought or made for the purpose of currying favour for a particular development with councillors aligned with the ALP.

In its investigation report, made public on 9 July 2002, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against six persons. The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of these six persons for specified offences and that consideration be given to the suspension of a councillor from civic office, with a view to their dismissal, for serious corrupt conduct.

The report canvasses the need for further reform of development control systems, and controls on political donations and influence at the local government level.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report on corrupt conduct associated with development proposals at Rockdale City Council (Operation Trophy).

2001

The ICAC investigated matters arising from a memorandum that a former employee of the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS), claimed to have discovered on his NPWS personnel file in the presence of another NPWS employee. The memorandum indicated that NPWS officers had engaged in corrupt and criminal conduct and also contained an inference that an ICAC officer was prepared to act inappropriately at the request of NPWS officers.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 19 December 2001, the ICAC made findings that the former employee had been responsible for creating the memorandum and placing it on his NPWS personnel file and made findings of corrupt conduct against him and the other employee. The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of both individuals for specified offences and that consideration be given to the taking of disciplinary action against the other employee.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated whether public officials acted improperly in relation to circumstances arising from a statement by the then Minister for Education and Training in the Legislative Assembly of the NSW Parliament on 10 April 2001. The Minister's statement concerned entries in a high school student’s diary, including descriptions of suicide and doing a ‘replica’ of the Columbine High School massacre. The ICAC's investigation focused on two specific matters:

  • whether public officials improperly ordered the NSW Police Media Unit to withdraw a media statement that contradicted the Minister's statement that police had been contacted about the incident, and
  • whether public officials falsified advice to the media that the student had access to a gun.

In the report on its investigation, made public on 10 August 2001, the ICAC made no findings of corrupt conduct against any person and stated its opinion that consideration should not be given to the prosecution of, or taking of disciplinary action against, any person.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the activities of two Liverpool City Council (LCC) contractors. The investigation into the first contractor concerned alleged irregularities in the disposal of LCC waste. The investigation into the other contractor examined allegations that it had deliberately failed to meet contract specifications or, in some instances, did not actually carry out work for which it was paid.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 31 July 2001, the ICAC made no findings of corrupt conduct against any person and stated its opinion that consideration should not be given to the prosecution of, or taking of disciplinary action against, any person.

The ICAC identified a number of deficiencies in the LCC's administration of the relevant contracts and listed eight key points to manage corruption risks associated with contracting by the public sector.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of an information technology specialist who was formerly employed by the State Rail Authority (SRA) in a division called the Data Network Management Group (DNMG). The ICAC examined the specialist’s conduct in: selling his own equipment, on his own advice, to the SRA at an inflated price and disguising the conflict of interest this created; having in his personal possession a substantial amount of SRA computer equipment; and engaging in outside employment.
During the investigation the conduct of an employee of another firm was also examined in relation to the first matter.

In its report on this investigation, made public on 27 April 2001, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against both individuals, and stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of the information technology specialist for specified offences. The report also made observations about a number of corruption risks identified in the course of this investigation and the implications for NSW public sector agencies.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

2000

The ICAC investigated whether there had been an attempted cover-up with regard to an alleged indecent assault by a Member of Parliament on a woman at the NSW Parliament House in September 2000.

In the report on its investigation, made public on 20 December 2000, the ICAC made findings that no person had acted to falsely concoct or withhold evidence, or attempted to improperly persuade anyone not to report or otherwise seek investigation of the alleged indecent assault, that is, to cover-up what had occurred on that evening, and that no person had engaged in corrupt conduct in relation to the matters investigated.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated allegations that former and serving officers of the Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA) and others were involved in the registration of stolen motor vehicles – ‘rebirthing’. The investigation also examined the activities of Authorised Unregistered Vehicle Inspection Station (AUVIS) in providing blue slips for fraudulent registrations.

In its investigation report, made public in November 2000, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against 31 individuals and stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of 29 persons for specified offences. The report also identified a number of corruption prevention issues to be addressed by the RTA.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of a Member of Parliament (MP) in relation to his use of air travel warrants and the entitlements of various members of Parliament towards payment for air charters organised by him on 6 and 7 May 1993, 25-29 July 1994, 28 September 1994 and 10 October 1994.

In its report on this investigation, made public in October 2000, the ICAC found that the Member and his electorate officer acted without due care, attention, and diligence. No findings of corrupt conduct were made against any person and the ICAC stated its opinion that consideration should not be given to the prosecution of, or taking of disciplinary action against, any person. A recommendation was made that the MP repay to Parliament the sum of $7,507.32 for air charters using warrants or entitlements that should not have been utilised.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of officers of South Sydney Council and others in relation to Council cleaning contracts. An audit report on Council cleaning contracts by the Council's Corporate Audit Group had found 13 instances of order splitting involving the Council's Cleaning Coordinator and a contractor, and 17 instances where work undertaken by a contractor was certified by the Council Cleaning Coordinator as being satisfactorily performed prior to the date the work was actually undertaken.

The ICAC's investigation focused on the Council's engagement and use of cleaning contractors, its recruitment and employment of new staff, whether the Council's Mayor or others had intervened in relation to the 1999 audit of cleaning contracts and the role of the Mayor and others in the decision to disband the Council's Corporate Audit Group.

In its report on this investigation, made public in October 2000, the ICAC found that there was no evidence that any officer of South Sydney Council or anyone else had engaged in corrupt conduct.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of officials of the Greyhound Racing Authority (NSW) (GRA) in relation to their dealings with the owners and trainers of racing greyhounds. In particular, the investigation focused on the relationships of the Chief Steward of the GRA with certain trainers and owners of greyhounds.

In its report on this investigation, made public in August 2000, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against the Chief Steward and five other people. The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of these six persons for specified offences.

In its report the ICAC also made 16 corruption resistance recommendations including in relation to review of the role of the steward’s powers, record-keeping, training and drug testing.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC conducted a major investigation into the conduct of officers of the NSW Department of Corrective Services and other persons in relation to the operation of that Department. Five investigation reports, each dealing with a separate aspect of this investigation were produced and made public between February 1998 and April 2000.

The fifth and final report on this investigation, made public in April 2000, concerned allegations of high-level corruption in the Department of Corrective Services in relation to two separate escape attempts by prison inmates in 1993 and 1996. The ICAC made no findings of corrupt conduct against any person in this report, stated its opinion that consideration should not be given to the prosecution of any person and stated its opinion that the Commissioner of the Department of Corrective Services should give consideration to taking disciplinary action against an acting Policy and Project Officer with the Department, in relation to his failure to provide accurate information to another DCS officer.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

1999

The ICAC investigated purchasing activities of Liverpool City Council and how that system was abused by its Purchasing Manager in his dealings with several contractors who were awarded contracts for Council work.

In its report on this investigation, made public in November 1999, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against the purchasing manager and seven contractors. The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of two persons for specified offences and recommended that the General Manager of Liverpool City Council finalise current disciplinary action against another Council officer in relation to conflict of interest matters. In its report the ICAC also examines what actions could have been taken by Council to prevent the purchasing manager's subversion of purchasing procedures.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of employees of the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) in their dealings with a number of companies and individuals holding approvals and licences issued by the EPA.

In its report on this investigation, made public in November 1999, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against eight people and two companies and stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of one person for specified offences. Information gathered as a result of this investigation was referred to the Australian Taxation Office.

The report also analysed corruption risks in regulatory functions and made a recommendation to the EPA that it assess the effectiveness of its various strategies to improve ethical standards and provide a report to the ICAC on its progress and achievements within the first 12 months of operation.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC conducted a major investigation into  the conduct of officers of the NSW Department of Corrective Services (DCS) and other persons in relation to the operation of that Department. Five investigation reports, each dealing with a separate aspect of this investigation were produced and made public between February 1998 and April 2000.

The fourth report on this investigation, made public in November 1999, dealt with the conduct of Leslie John Kelly, a DCS correctional officer, while he was Acting Governor of the Wollongong Periodic Detention Centre (WPDC), in particular his handling of complaints against other correctional officers, his attitude towards certain detainees and the maintenance of discipline within the WPDC. In this report the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against Mr Kelly and stated its opinion that consideration be given to his prosecution for specified offences and to the taking of disciplinary action against him with a view to his dismissal.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of officers of the Illawarra Development Board (IDB) in relation to its financial affairs, the disposition of Board assets and the audit, control, management, supervision and other systems and procedures in place in relation to the IDB to 30 June 1990 and thereafter in relation to the dissolution of the IDB and the disposition of its remaining assets.

In its report on this investigation, made public in October 1999, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against the former Executive Officer of the IDB and Regional Development Manager of the Department of State and Regional Development. The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration be given to:

  • his prosecution for specified criminal offences,
  • the taking of action against him with a view to terminating his employment,
  • the taking of action against him for specified disciplinary offences, and
  • instituting civil proceedings against him for the recovery of unlawfully appropriated public monies.

In its report the ICAC also made seven corruption prevention recommendations to the Department of State and Regional Development in particular and to all public sector agencies in general.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the practices and procedures of Aboriginal land councils in NSW and produced three reports on this investigation between April 1998 and October 1999.

The third and final report, made public in October 1999, concerned the conduct of councillors of the NSW Aboriginal Land Council (NSWALC), in particular claims made by them for travel and other expenses. In this report the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against three NSWALC councillors and stated its opinion that consideration be given to their prosecution for specified offences, the taking of disciplinary action against them with a view to their dismissal as councillors and, in the event that they do not repay money wrongly claimed, received and retained by them, to civil proceedings by NSWALC against them for the recovery of such money.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of ticket sellers at Manly Wharf. The investigation disclosed that a number of employees manipulated the ticket selling machines at Manly Wharf to produce tickets that could be sold but which were not recorded by the ticketing system as sold tickets.

In its report on this investigation, made public in October 1999, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against five former Sydney Ferries employees and stated its opinion that consideration should not be given to the prosecution of, or taking of disciplinary action against, any person.

The ICAC established that the corrupt conduct had occurred because no one in the revenue department of Sydney Ferries or supervisors of the relevant staff were aware of how the ticket machines operated or understood the system’s internal checks to detect fraud. An analysis of the shortcomings that permitted the ticket sellers’ misconduct to go undetected for so long and the changes made by Sydney Ferries in response were detailed in the report.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC conducted a major investigation into the conduct of officers of the NSW Department of Corrective Services (DCS) and other persons in relation to the operation of that Department. Five investigation reports, each dealing with a separate aspect of this investigation were produced and made public between February 1998 and April 2000.

The ICAC's third report on this investigation, made public in June 1999, dealt with the activities of two former correctional officers in terms of inappropriate relationships and dealings with serving and former inmates. This segment of the investigation also examined aspects of the DCS Work Release Program and testing of inmates by urinalysis for prohibited substances.

This segment of the investigation established that one of the former correctional officers had smuggled drugs to a prison inmate and removed adverse documents from an inmate’s official file in return for cash payments, and that the other former correctional officer had developed improper associations with serving and former inmates, told a work release inmate of staff shortages and movements, and warned an inmate of impending drug testing.  

In its report the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against the two former correctional officers and three other persons and stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of one of the former correctional officers and two other persons for specified offences.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated allegations that Sydney City Council employees working as weighbridge operators at the St Peters waste depot were accepting bribes from the operators of commercial waste disposal businesses to understate the quantity of waste tipped at the depot by those businesses.

In its report on this investigation, made public in June 1999. the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against two former Sydney City Council weighbridge operators, two operators of a commercial waste disposal company, and against their company. The ICAC recommended that consideration be given to the prosecution of these four inviduals and of the company for specified offences.

In the course of its investigation into this matter the ICAC received and investigated allegations of similar conduct at other waste disposal depots operated by NSW councils, including allegations that weighbridge operators at Gosford City Council's South Woy Woy waste depot were accepting bribes in return for allowing commercial waste disposal businesses to tip waste at that depot without charge. The ICAC urged all NSW councils to refer to the 10 corruption prevention recommendations made by the ICAC  and implemented by Sydney City Council.

 This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the practices and procedures of Aboriginal land councils in NSW and produced three reports on this investigation between April 1998 and October 1999.

The second report on this investigation, made public in June 1999, deals with the ICAC's investigation of a number of complaints made against individuals in the Aboriginal land council system at or prior to the investigation, which commenced in late 1994. The complaints alleged misuse of land council money and assets, maladministration, lack of proper record-keeping, nepotism, cronyism, other favouritism and conflicts of interest.

In its report on this phase of the investigation the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against 11 persons and stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of five of these persons for specified offences, to the removal of two of these persons from their positions as chairpersons of Local Aboriginal Land Councils and to the removal of one of these persons as a councillor of the NSW Aboriginal Land Council.  

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

1998

The ICAC investigated the use of parliamentary and electorate travel entitlements and other parliamentary allowances and produced two investigation reports. 

The ICAC's first report on this investigation, made public in April 1998, deals with the conduct of seven members of the NSW Parliament in relation to five air charters organised by one of the MPs when he was Shadow Minister for Transport and Roads. In this report the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against one member of Parliament and recommended that consideration be given to his prosecution for specified offences and that consideration should be given by the NSW Legislative Assembly to the taking of action against him in respect of his membership of the Legislative Assembly.

The ICAC's second report on this investigation, made public in December 1998, deals with the ICAC's analysis of the use of the entitlements and allowances allocated to members of the NSW Parliament and the relevant administrative systems operating within the NSW Parliament. Sixty-three recommendations were made in the report for the reform of parliamentary administrative systems.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated allegations made by a convicted criminal that he had corruptly provided money and other benefits to a member of the NSW Parliament.

In its report in this investigation, made public in December 1998, the ICAC made no findings of corrupt conduct against any person.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC conducted a major investigation into  the conduct of officers of the NSW Department of Corrective Services (DCS) and other persons in relation to the operation of that Department. Five investigation reports, each dealing with a separate aspect of this investigation were produced and made public between February 1998 and April 2000.

The second report on this investigation, made public in November 1998, dealt with the conduct of a former DCS employee and a nurse formerly employed by the Corrections Health Service (CHS) and their relationships with inmates. Findings of corrupt conduct were made against the former DCS employee, the former CHS employee and an inmate

The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of the former CHS employee for specified offences and to the taking of action against her for professional misconduct and/or unsatisfactory conduct pursuant to the provisions contained in Part 5 of the Nurses Act 1991.

The report identifies a number of relevant corruption prevention issues and notes actions taken by DCS and CHS to address these.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the exercise by an Alderman of Fairfield City Council of his official duties in respect of two development applications considered by the Council.

In its report on this investigation, made public in November 1998, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against the former Alderman and five other persons and stated its opinion that consideration be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of the former Alderman and four other persons for specified offences.

The ICAC's report also recommended that consideration be given to amending the definition of "agent" in section 249A of the Crimes Act 1900 so as to expressly include a local government councillor and proposed to refer matters relating to certain cash payments to the Australian Taxation Office.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of a senior inspector with the Department of Gaming and Racing, specifically his dealings with the owner of a licensed hotel and his financial and business relationships with a number of other persons associated with other licensed premises.

In its report on this investigation, made public in September 1998, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct in respect of the former inspector and an associate. No recommendations in relation to prosecution or disciplinary action were made in the report. The report also identifies corruption risks associated with inspectorial and licensing functions and reports on action taken by the Department of Gaming and Racing to address these risks.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated four separate occurrences of serious corruption in the former State Rail Authority (SRA). The first investigation concerned the theft and sale of SRA property, laundering of the proceeds and tendering processes. The second investigation concerned overtime abuse, bribery and favouritism in allocation of maintenance work. The third investigation concerned conflict of interest and dishonesty in allocation of carriage cleaning contracts and the fourth investigation concerned bribery in relation to certification of carriage cleaning work.

In its report on these investigations, made public in June 1998, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against 16 persons and stated its opinion that consideration be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of 15 people for specified offences.

The report also details the corruption prevention strategies formulated by the rail organisations into which the former SRA was divided: FreightCorp, the Rail Access Corporation, the Railway Services Authority and the State Rail Authority.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the disposal of specific waste and surplus assets by TransGrid, the NSW public authority responsible for the high-voltage transmission system in NSW; Pacific Power, one of three State owned corporations responsible for electricity generation in NSW and Integral Energy, one of six State owned corporations responsible for the distribution of electricity in NSW.  

In its report on this investigation, made public in June 1998, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against seven persons and stated its opinion that consideration be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of four of these persons for specified offences.

The report also analyses the corruption risks associated with the disposal of assets and details action taken by TransGrid, Pacific Power and Integral Energy to address these risks.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of staff of the Glebe Morgue and their dealings with certain funeral directors. The investigation focused on benefits received by Morgue staff (Forensic Assistants) for the referral of funerals to funeral directors and the management of the personal effects of deceased persons.

In its report on this investigation, made public in March 1998, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against 15 persons - 13 current or former Glebe Morgue staff and two directors of a private funeral director business - and stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of eight of these persons for specified offences.

The report also identifies corruption issues relevant to this investigation and details fraud and corruption control actions taken by the authorities responsible for the Glebe Morgue: the Department of Health and the Central Sydney Area Health Service.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC conducted a major investigation into the conduct of officers of the NSW Department of Corrective Services (DCS) and other persons in relation to the operation of that Department. Five investigation reports, each dealing with a separate aspect of this investigation were produced and made public between February 1998 and April 2000.

The ICAC's first report on this investigation, made public in February 1998, dealt with allegations relating to the conduct of one Prison Officer. The ICAC's investigation established that the Prison Officer was responsible for instigating an assault by one or more prisoners on another prisoner. The investigation also disclosed improper associations by the Prison Officer with two persons, one of whom was a known drug trafficker and the other of whom was a well-known Sydney crime figure.

In this report the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against the Prison Officer, the known drug trafficker and the crime figure. It was also recommended that consideration be given to the prosecution of the drug trafficker for offences under section 87 of the ICAC Act.

The report also detailed inadequacies in the then current DCS policy in relation to the entry to and exit from correctional centres by prison officers, and the searching of items carried by them into prisons. The ICAC recommended that the DCS develop a new policy to govern prison officers' entry into and exit from correctional officers and to search prison officers for contraband items they may be smuggling in for prisoners.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

1997

The ICAC investigated the conduct of a building inspector formerly employed by Lane Cove Council in relation to property developments; the conduct of one person, a local business owner, in relation to certain councillors of Holroyd City Council; and the conduct of two persons in their dealings with Fairfield City Council in relation to a property development.

In its report on this investigation, made public in November 1997, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against each of the above four persons and stated its opinion that consideration should be given by the Director of Public Prosecutions to the prosecution of the first two of these persons, also noting that the last-mentioned two persons had already been prosecuted in relation to the conduct investigated.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the circumstances surrounding the offering of no evidence on an All Grounds Appeal at Lismore District Court on 25 May 1995 relating to a charge of goods in custody; and the relationship between certain officers of the Lismore Office of the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) and members of the New South Wales legal profession, and the effect of those relationships upon the administration of justice.

In its report on this investigation, made public in June 1997, the ICAC made no findings of corrupt conduct against any person. In its report the ICAC noted the absence or inadequacy of, and departures from, proper systems and procedures in the Lismore Office of the DPP and made recommendations to the DPP to address these deficiencies.  

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the circumstances surrounding the formulation and adoption of Byron Shire Council’s Residential Development Strategy and certain events arising within this context; and the Council's conduct in relation to land known locally as the Conference Centre site. 

The ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against a former employee of the Council and two other persons in relation to allegations made concerning the Council's conduct and stated its opinion that consideration should be given to their prosecution for specified offences, including the common law offence of conspiracy to commit a public mischief.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

1996

The ICAC investigated the evaluation conducted by the Public Employment Office (PEO) of the position of Director-General, Department of Community Services. The ICAC also investigated the recommendation and decision relating to the removal and unattachment of the incumbent Director-General from that position and the subsequent decision to revoke his removal.

The ICAC's report on this investigation, made public in November 1996, made no findings of corrupt conduct against any person. Recommendations were made in the report that consideration be given to the taking of disciplinary action against two PEO officers.

The ICAC’s investigation identified serious flaws in practices and procedures of the PEO in relation to the administration of the job evaluation process and made six corruption recommendations - four to the Premier's Department and two to all NSW public sector organisations. 

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of a former Police Air Wing officer in relation to the allocation of all Police Air Wing charter work for fixed-wing aircraft to one private charter company.

In its report on this investigation, made public in October 1996, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against the former Police Air Wing Officer and stated its opinion that consideration should be given to his prosecution for a specified offence and to the taking of disciplinary action against him.

The ICAC also made findings of corrupt conduct against the proprietor of the private charter company to which Police Air Wing charter work had been allocated, and stated that it proposed to refer the general issue of the proprietor's and his company's non-compliance with Commonwealth legislation dealing with aircraft safety and maintenance to the appropriate Commonwealth authority.

In its report, the ICAC identified issues related to secondary employment and procurement that allowed corruption to occur and continue, and resulted in one private company obtaining an effective monopoly over Polic Air Wing charter work, at considerable cost to taxpayers.  

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated allegations concerning the conduct of the Chairman of Stewards of the Harness Racing Authority of NSW.

In its report on this investigation, made public in August 1996, the ICAC stated that it had found no direct credible evidence to support the allegations made against the Chairman of Stewards, nor any other evidence from which the truth of the allegations could legitimately be inferred. No findings of corrupt conduct or recommendations with respect to the prosecution or taking of disciplinary action against any person were made in the report. The ICAC made a recommendation that the Code of Conduct with regard to harness racing stewards be revised to better regulate relationships between stewards and others involved in harness racing operations.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the purported termination of the employment agreements of the then two most senior officers of Southern Mitchell Electricity (SME), the General Manager and Assistant General Manager, and the decision of the SME Board to pay them a total amount of $1.4 million as a consequence of such termination.

In its report on this investigation, made public in January 1996, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against the former General Manager and Assistant General Manager. No recommendations were made that consideration be given to the prosecution of any person for a criminal offence. A recommendation was made that consideration be given to the taking of disciplinary action against a solicitor who had been engaged to provide legal advice regarding the General Manager and Assistant General Managers' contractual situation.  

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

1995

The ICAC investigated the circumstances surrounding the payment of a parliamentary pension to a former member of the NSW Parliament who had been convicted of taxation offences. 

The ICAC produced two reports on this investigation.

In its first report, made public in February 1995, the ICAC stated that it had found no evidence of corrupt conduct on the part of any public official or former public official, but had found that the law and practice concerning the effects of a conviction of a member of Parliament are unclear and in need of clarification.

This report is no longer available online. Request the first report.

In its second report, made public in April 1996, the ICAC addressed matters including the criteria for vacating a seat in Parliament, the concept of "infamous crime" in the Constitution Act 1902, the process for calling a by-election in the event of the vacation of a seat and its relationship to the relevant legislation. The ICAC made five recommendations to address these issues, including that relevant sections of the NSW Constitution and Parliamentary Electorates and Election Act 1912 be amended.

This report is no longer available online. Request the second report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of councillors and officers of Randwick City Council in the processing of development and building applications and the relationships between councillors, council officers and developers.

In its report on this investigation, made public in February 1995, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against six persons. The ICAC recommended that the NSW Director of Public Prosecutions consider the prosecution of four persons for specified offences, and that the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions consider the prosecution of one of these persons for taxation offences.

In the course of this investigation the ICAC released an issues paper dealing with discretion in development control processes and took submissions received into account in preparing its report. The ICAC made nine corruption prevention recommendations to address the issues identified, including for changes to council staff employment contracts and conditions and changes to development control legislation and processes.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated dealings between a sales administrator employed by the Roads and Traffic Authority (RTA), and a number of real estate agents retained by the RTA to sell land.

In its report on this investigation, made public in February 1995, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against the sales administrator and four real estate agents, and recommended that consideration should be given to the prosecution of the sales administrator for specified offences and to the taking of disciplinary action against him with a view to dismissing him from the RTA, dispensing with or otherwise terminating his services.

In its report the ICAC also analysed the findings of an RTA review of property disposal policies and procedures, summarised remedial action proposed by the RTA, and made six corruption prevention recommendations to the RTA.

 This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

1994

The ICAC investigated allegations that members of the NSW Police Service protected paedophiles from criminal investigation or prosecution. The ICAC also investigated whether the procedures of or relationships between the NSW Police Service and other public authorities adversely affected police investigations and the prosecution of paedophiles and the conduct of public officials related to these matters.

The investigation arose from a referral from both Houses of the NSW Parliament. In its report on this investigation, which was made public as an interim report in September 1994, the ICAC outlined the findings from its review of the structures, functions, policies, procedures and practices on NSW government agencies with a role in the investigation and prosecution of child abuse and made suggestions for improving the system for reporting and investigating child sexual abuse.

 This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

This investigation concerned the discovery of confidential NSW Police Service documents, a police badge and other items in the possession of criminals. The ICAC's investigation focused mainly on the discovery that several criminals possessed copies of the SIG's Major Active Criminals (MAC) List, which included details of known criminals, their associates, types of activity for which the person was known or suspected, and the identity of police interested in the individual.

In its report on this investigation, made public in June 1994, the ICAC stated it would refer information that suggested that a serving member of the NSW Police Service may have accepted a bribe from a known criminal in exchange for the "fixing" of a prosecution to the Director of Public Prosecutions for his consideration of charges of bribery. The report also analysed relevant policies and procedures relating to the protection of confidential information and made seven corruption prevention recommendations to the NSW Police Service.

 This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the relationship between police (especially detectives) and criminals after January 1975, with particular reference to defined areas of criminality, including armed robberies and illegal gambling. The ICAC also examined the practices and procedures of the NSW Police Service in handling complaints made by police officers against police officers.

The ICAC produced two reports on this investigation.

In its first report, made public in February 1994, the ICAC examined the dealings between police and criminals in several sets of circumstances, including criminals paying money to police to avoid prosecution or conviction. Findings of corrupt conduct were made against 11 persons and recommendations were made that consideration be given to the prosecution of, or taking of disciplinary action against, 13 persons.

This report is no longer available online. Request the first report.

The ICAC's second report, made public in April 1994, focused on the administrative systems and management issues identified in the course of the investigation: management of informers; conduct of criminal investigations; record-keeping; police and prosecutions; and misconduct and complaints. Sixteen corruption prevention recommendations were made in this report.  

This report is no longer available online. Request the second report.

The ICAC was requested by resolution of both Houses of the NSW Parliament to investigate whether procedures relating to a defamation case brought by a member of the NSW Parliament and its settlement were acceptable having regard, amongst other things, to practices and procedures in the public sector and whether any improper influence was exercised by any person or persons in this process.

In 1988 the then Deputy Leader of the Opposition sued an individual and two newspaper companies for defamation. The plaintiff lost the case and was ordered to pay costs. The Department of Health paid the defendant's costs.

The plaintiff appealed and the appeal was settled on terms that abandoned the order for costs. The Department of Health approved the settlement. The investigation by the ICAC sought to identify reasons, opportunities, ways or means whereby pressure or influence might have been brought to bear and, if so, by whom.

In its report on this investigation, made public in January 1994, the ICAC made findings that  that there had been no improper influence exercised by any person, and that the correct procedures had been followed by the Department of Health.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

1993

The ICAC investigated the conduct of a former Alderman of Coffs Harbour City Council, in relation to his dealings with developers in the Coffs Harbour district between September 1987 and September 1991.

In its report on this investigation, made public in November 1993, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct  against the former Alderman and against a local property developer.

The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of the former Alderman for bribery and the prosecution of the property developer for bribery and secret commission offences.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the professional relationship between the NSW Ombudsman and a private individual, who owned companies manufacturing gaming machines ("the company owner") and for whom the Ombudsman had acted as a solicitor prior to his appointment as NSW Ombudsman in February 1988.

The company owner had made complaints prior to that date to the Office of the NSW Ombudsman against certain police officers, which were still under consideration at the time of the Ombudsman's appointment in February 1988.

The ICAC's investigation sought to establish whether the NSW Ombudsman had affected, or attempted to affect, the honest and impartial performance of the functions of the Deputy Ombudsman or any other officer of the Ombudsman in relation to their investigation or inquiry into, or reporting on, the complaints made by the company owner.

In its report on this investigation, made public in June 1999, the ICAC found no evidence of impropriety of any sort and made no findings of corrupt conduct against any person.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC conducted an investigation into (1) the operation and management of Trackfast between April 1989 and December 1991 and (2) the methods of allocating work to and making payments to contractors in the Northern Region of the State Rail Authority (SRA) between June 1989 and December 1991 and produced two reports, each dealing with one segment of the investigation.

The ICAC's second report, made public in March 1993, was principally concerned with dealings between the SRA and certain contractors, relating to the hire of plant and equipment for use on geotechnical sites in the Northern Region of NSW. The ICAC's investigation established that certain contractors and SRA officers had colluded in the presentation of invoices to the SRA supported by dockets falsely recording the equipment hired or the work carried out on site. 

In this report the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against 10 persons, three of whom were or had been SRA employees, and two private companies, and stated its opinion that consideration should be given to the prosecution of 10 persons for specified offences and the taking of disciplinary action against one person. The report also details action taken by the SRA to remedy the deficiencies revealed in the course of the ICAC's investigation.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of public officials, including prison officers and police, in relation to the use of informers, prisoners and indemnified persons to assist in the investigation and prosecution process; whether any such persons had been encouraged or discouraged to act in a particular way by any public official; and the operations of the Internal Investigation Unit and the Special Operations Division of the Department of Corrective Services in relation to these matters.

The ICAC produced two reports on this investigation, both of which were made public in January 1993.

The ICAC's first report dealt with the issues rather than individuals and contained recommendations for change to systems.

This report is no longer available online. Request the first report.

The second report dealt with eight of the nine prosecutions investigated in the course of this investigation. In this report the ICAC made a finding of corrupt conduct against a senior DCS officer and stated its opinion that consideration be given to the taking of disciplinary action against him. The officer sought review by the Supreme Court of the ICAC's findings. The Supreme Court made declaration that the ICAC's finding that the officer had engaged in corrupt conduct was made without or in excess of jurisdiction and was a nullity. In its report the ICAC also stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of another DCS officer for specified offences. 

This report is no longer available online. Request the second report.

1992

The ICAC conducted an investigation into (1) the operation and management of Trackfast between April 1989 and December 1991 and (2) the methods of allocating work to and making payments to contractors in the Northern Region of the State Rail Authority (SRA) between June 1989 and December 1991. The ICAC produced two reports, each dealing with one segment of the investigation.

The ICAC's first report, made public in September 1992, was concerned with the awarding and renegotiation of an interim contract for door-to-door delivery within the Sydney Metropolitan area, the awarding of a contract for small freight delivery and payments under that contract.

In its report the ICAC made a finding of corrupt conduct against the then Fleet Resources Manager of Trackfast and stated its opinion that consideration should be given to the taking of disciplinary action against him.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the unauthorised release of Government information and the trade of such information. The investigation disclosed a massive illicit trade in government information and identified more than 250 people who had participated over many years in the widespread improper sale and exchange of information from a variety of State and Commonwealth government sources and the private sector.

The ICAC's report on this investigation, in three volumes, was made public in August 1992. In its report the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against 155 persons and findings of conduct liable to allow, encourage or cause the occurrence of corrupt conduct against 101 persons. Thirty-seven of those found to have engaged in corrupt conduct in connection with the trade in confidential government information were police officers at the time. Another 18 found to have engaged in corrupt conduct in connection with that trade, were Department of Main Roads or Roads and Traffic Authority officials at the time.

The ICAC stated its opinion that consideration be given to obtaining the advice of the Director of Public Prosecutions with respect to the prosecution of 106 persons, and that consideration be given to the taking of discipinary action against or dismissal of 30 persons.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of a former member of Maitland City Council in relation to his alleged association and dealings with a property developer and associated companies or businesses.  

In its report on this investigation, made public in July 1992, the ICAC made no findings of corrupt conduct against any person.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated matters in relation to the resignation of a member of the NSW Parliament, and his subsequent appointment to a position in the NSW Senior Executive Service.

In its first report on this investigation, made public in June 1992, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct in relation to the then Premier of NSW and the then Minister for the Environment, and stated its opinion that consideration should not be given to the prosecution of or the taking of disciplinary action against any person, nor to the dismissal of any public official.

This report is no longer available online. Request the first report.

The ICAC's findings that the then Premier of NSW and the then Minister for the Environment, had engaged in corrupt conduct within the meaning of the ICAC Act, were the subject of litigation in the NSW Court of Appeal. The Court declared that the findings were a nullity. Accordingly, the ICAC produced a second report, made public in September 1992, to correct the record, state the effect of the Court of Appeal decision and to raise issues concerning the ICAC Act and desirable changes to it.

This report is no longer available online. Request the second report.

The ICAC's third report on this investigation, made public in March 1993, made 12 recommendations with respect to integrity in public sector recruitment.

This report is no longer available online. Request the third report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of officers of the Sydney Water Board and others in relation to the Water Board's management of sludge disposal, and the Water Board's sludge management tender processes between 1 January 1988 and 30 June 1991.

In its report on this investigation, made public in May 1992, the ICAC stated its opinion that consideration should be given to taking disciplinary action against the then Chief Economist with the Board, for misconduct, and to taking action against him with a view to terminating his services, for his failure to perform his duties impartially.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the terms and conditions of marketing agreements entered into between the New South Wales Film Corporation and an American distribution company, Pepper Distribution Inc.

Issues canvassed in the investigation included the Corporation's failure to consult those who made the films about the terms on which they were licensed to Pepper and the employment of a former public official with a company with which that person had considerable dealings in his former role.

In its report on this investigation, made public in March 1992, the ICAC stated its opinion that consideration should not be given to the prosecution of, or taking of disciplinary action against, any person, nor to the dismissal of any public official.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the nature of conflicts between public duty and private interest which arose in the period 1 January 1985 and 30 March 1991, and the manner in which they were dealt with, within local government, involving both state and local government and involving both local government and the private sector.

The ICAC's report on this investigation, made public in March 1992, made recommendations for change, particularly the establishing of a Local Government Tribunal empowered to inquire into allegations of, or circumstances suggesting any such breach, with power to disqualify, suspend, reprimand, or counsel the individual concerned, or dismiss the allegation. The report also made recommendations, particularly to changes in laws, practices and procedures, in local government.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

This report concerned an investigation into the conduct of persons involved in or connected with the awarding and performance of contracts for the haulage of gravel and sandstone, the hire of road plant and equipment (particularly in relation to the Wiangaree Deviation), road works generally, and in particular practices followed in charging the Roads and Traffic Authority in relation to works in the Shire of Kyogle since December 1987.

A range of recommendations on the consideration of the dismissal and prosecution of persons were made in the report, made public on 1 January 1992.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

1991

The ICAC investigated the conduct of officers of South Sydney Council, in particular those in its Planning and Building Department, in relation to the preparation and processing of development and building applications, the performance of work for private clients, and referrals to architects and others from 1 January 1989 to 1991.

The investigation concentrated firstly on the relationship between the Council's Deputy Manager - Strategic and his brother's architectural firm, and the way in which development and building applications prepared by the firm were dealt with by Council officers and, secondly, on private work performed by Council employees.

The Council's Deputy Manager - Strategic was found to have engaged in corrupt conduct. The report, made public in December 1991, stated the opinion that the Council should give consideration to his dismissal from the Council. No findings of corrupt conduct were made against any other individual.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of persons connected with or involved in the tendering for, or letting of Department of Administrative Services performance contract for, the supply and laying of vinyl floor coverings from August 1987 to 1991. The vinyl products component of the contract was worth about $750,000 each year. 

The tender process was controlled by an Administrative Services officer and during his tenure in that position a floor covering supply company had benefitted from the award of work. It was revealed that the Administration Services Officer and the managing director of the company were close friends.

The ICAC's report on this investigation, made public in July 1991, found that the conduct of the former Administrative Services Officer was corrupt in nature, but stated the opinion that consideration should not be given to the prosecution of any person in relation to this investigation. The report also commented on deficiencies in the Department's procurement processes and issues relating to post-separation employment and stated that it would undertake corruption prevention work on procurement processes.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

This report concerned an investigation into the Maritime Services Board’s (MSB) tendering process for helicopter services in 1987-88 and the association between the then MSB officer and the successful tenderer, a company with no prior experience with helicopters, that won the tender, but performed the contract unsatisfactorily. When the contract expired, helicopter services were provided on an ad hoc basis by the company operating under another name.

In its report on this investigation, made public in July 1991, the ICAC made findings that the conduct of the then MSB officer was corrupt in relation to the tendering process, and stated its opinion that consideration be given to his dismissal but that consideration not be given to his prosecution. The report also recommended that consideration be given to the creation of a new offence forbidding public servants from entering into contracts with government.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated allegations of corrupt practices on the part of certain NSW Police officers in relation to the heavy vehicle repair industry in and around Wagga Wagga.

The most important allegation investigated was that payments were made to police officers for confidential information, or in the vernacular, that police were acting as spotters for the truck repair companies.

As a result of work done in late 1990 and early 1991 by a joint police-ICAC team, three police officers were charged with serious offences.

The ICAC's report on its subsequent investigation, made public in May 1991, stated the opinion that consideration be given to criminal or disciplinary proceedings against a further two police officers.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

This report concerned an investigation into the conduct of the former Member for Bankstown in the New South Wales Legislative Assembly in relation to his dealings with a named person between January 1985 and July 1986.

The named person, who was seeking to subdivide a property at Wallacia, west of Sydney, alleged that there was a conspiracy to delay the water being put on by the then Metropolitan Water, Sewerage and Drainage Board, that a Member of Parliament whose help he solicited was a party to that conspiracy, and that the Member of Parliament tried to solicit $250,000 from him for the purpose of bribery.

In its report on this investigation, made public in April 1991, the ICAC made no recommendations that consideration be given to the prosecution of or taking of disciplinary action against any person. The report suggested that the NSW Parliament could do more by way of inducting members, by providing them with guidance, and perhaps developing a code of conduct.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of NSW Police in the Sutherland district, in particular officers responsible for licensed premises, and the handling of complaints against police in that district, in particular complaints in connection with licensed premises. The investigation focused on allegations that for an 18-month period from 1984, weekly payments had been made by the Caringbah Inn Hotel’s licensee to a licensing police officer.

In its report on the investigation, made public in February 1991, the ICAC stated its opinion that consideration should be given to the prosecution of one person, a former NSW Police officer, for common law bribery.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of persons involved in the making, processing and determination of development applications within the Municipality of Waverley between July 1982 and 1990 and the conduct of a former Engineer/Planner of Waverley Municipal Council in that role between July 1982 and July 1988, in particular his relationship with Dainford Ltd and associated companies. 

In its report on this investigation, made public in January 1991, the ICAC states its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of  the Managing Director of Dainford and the former Engineer/Planner for offences against section 249B of the Crimes Act 1900.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

1990

The ICAC investigated the payment of sums of money by driving instructors, with or without the knowledge of their pupils, to driver examiners.  The period under investigation was the 1980s, when licences were issued by the Department of Motor Transport and, from January 1989, the Roads and Traffic Authority.

In its two-volume investigation report, made public in December 1990, the ICAC made corrupt conduct findings against 61 individuals. The ICAC recommended to the Chief Executive of the Roads and Traffic Authority that consideration be given to terminating the services of 14 driver examiners, and the driving instructor's licenses of 23 individuals. The report also states the opinion that the Department of Public Prosecutions consider the prosecution of 13 individuals for specified criminal charges, including giving false evidence pursuant to section 87 of the ICAC Act.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated allegations, reported to the ICAC by the NSW Commissioner of Police, that harassing telephone calls made to an individual's residence in and after March 1990 had been traced to Mt Druitt Police Station.

In its report on this investigation, made public in December 1990, the ICAC made findings of corrupt conduct against five persons, including four NSW Police officers, and stated its opinion that consideration be given to the prosecution of three of these persons for specified criminal offences and the taking of disciplinary action against four of these persons.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated allegations concerning the conduct of persons involved in the calling and processing of tenders in relation to the Walsh Bay redevelopment project during the late 1980s, and the possible leaking of confidential information in relation to the tender process.

In its report on this investigation, made public in October 1990, the ICAC made no findings of corrupt conduct and stated the opinion that there was insufficient evidence to warrant consideration of prosecution or the taking of disciplinary action against any person or the dismissal of any public official.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the conduct of persons connected with or involved in the tendering for, or letting or performance of contracts or, the supply and laying of carpets in premises occupied or used by NSW public authorities, including the New South Wales Departments of Health, Housing, Technical and Further Education, and Public Works, from January 1985 to 1990.

The ICAC's report on this investigation, made public in September 1990, recommended that consideration be given to the prosecution of six persons for offences under section 249B of the Crimes Act 1900 and the taking of disciplinary action under section 66 of the Public Sector Management Act 1988 against one person.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated an allegation that, during late 1989, there had been an offer to pay money to a teacher at the Randwick TAFE College as an inducement or reward to pass some sprinkler fitter apprentices who were expected otherwise to fail.

The ICAC's report on this investigation, made public in August 1990, made findings that there was no evidence warranting consideration of prosecution of any person for any criminal offence, and that questions of disciplinary action or the removal of any public official from office did not arise.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the processing and registration of deposited plan DP 787368 at the Land Titles Office, in particular the conduct of a former LTO employee who was engaged as a consultant and paid a fee to facilitate registration of DP 787368.

In its investigation report, made public in July 1990, the ICAC made findings that there was no sufficient evidence warranting consideration of the prosecution of two named individuals for any offence, and no grounds for disciplinary action against or dismissal of any public official.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated several land rezoning and development applications and related transactions on the NSW north coast which involved members of Tweed Shire Council, including the then Tweed Shire Council Deputy President, the then Chairman of the North Coast Industry Development Board and a land development consultant. 

The ICAC's report on this investigation, made public in July 1990, stated the opinion that consideration be given to the taking of disciplinary action against two persons and the prosecution of 18 persons for specified criminal offences including common law bribery, conspiracy to bribe and giving false evidence.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated the circumstances surrounding the granting and enforcement of a licence to excavate, fill and otherwise operate on land at or near the Silverwater Prison Complex to Bradshaw Waste Industries Pty Ltd by the Corrective Services Commission or the Department of Corrective Services, after January 1982, and the conduct of persons, including present and former public officials.

In its investigation report, made public in February 1990, the ICAC stated that there was insufficient evidence to warrant consideration of the prosecution of any person for any offence, or the taking of disciplinary action against any person, or the taking of action against any public official with a view to dismissal.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

1989

The ICAC investigated allegations arising out of a raid by NSW Police officers on premises in Redfern. It was alleged then and later that evidence was fabricated to the detriment of the then occupant of the premises. Those said to be involved were senior police officers.

During the exercise of the search warrant a small quantity of heroin was found but the occupant of the premises complained on the day that the heroin had been 'planted' in a pocket of his suit coat.  

In its investigation report, made public in December 1989, the ICAC stated that there was insufficient evidence to justify prosecution of any of the five Police officers subject of the investigation in relation to the alleged fabrication of evidence. The report also recommended that "close consideration be given to amending the ICAC Act, and in particular s.74(5), so as to render it sensible and comprehensible".

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

The ICAC investigated an alleged attempt to solicit a large bribe in order to facilitate approval from Sydney City Council for the development of a property, in the central business district of Sydney then known as the Park Plaza site, owned by Japanese construction company Kumagai Gumi Co. Ltd.

In its investigation report, made public in October 1989, the ICAC stated that there was sufficient evidence to warrant consideration of prosecution of one individual, engaged by Kumagai Gumi as a consultant, for specified criminal offences.

This report is no longer available online. Request the report.

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